Nutrition Experts

Question:
Is it true that eating soup can help with weight loss?
Answer:
It seems so, which is super news for soup lovers! Several research studies suggest that eating soup is an effective way to help reduce calories. Among the findings:

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People who sipped a low-calorie soup as their first course ate about 100 fewer calories for their entire meal compared to those who ate an entrée without soup.

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Eating soup (such as chicken noodle soup) helped people reduce the calories in meals more effectively than eating the ingredients separately (chicken and noodles), followed by a glass of water.

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Almost everyone (97%) who included soup as part of a low-calorie diet plan said that soup was a valuable component of their weight-loss plan.

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People who ate soup one or two times a day as part of a reduced-calorie weight loss plan successfully lost weight and maintained an average 14-pound weight loss after a year.

However, here are a few caveats to soup's role in weight loss:
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First, broth-based soups are usually lower in calories and fat than their cream-based counterparts, so make broth-based types your go-to choices. Best bets are soups that range between 100 and 150 calories per serving.

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Second, canned soups tend to be high in sodium. Some contain 900 mg per cup, which is nearly 40 percent of the 2,300 mg daily sodium limit recommended for most people (the recommendation for certain groups such as African-Americans and people with high blood pressure is stricter—no more than 1,500 mg of sodium daily). Choose reduced- or low-sodium canned soups most often.

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Finally, although soup may be a tasty tool in the battle of the bulge, it's not a magic bullet. A healthy and effective plan promotes slow and steady weight loss by trimming calories and including a variety of nutritious foods (fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats and fat-free milk products) — plus plenty of daily physical activity.
Nutritionist Experts
Our Nutrition Experts are registered dietitians who hold master's degrees and are members of the American Dietetic Association and several specialty nutrition groups. They combine over 40 years experience in food and nutrition science, communications and counseling, the culinary arts and the development of nutrition education materials. They are quoted frequently in the national media and have written about nutrition for many major magazines, newspapers, and newsletters.